23

HOME SAFETY

Posted by rayliew on 9:51 PM
We all know that with regards to safety of our homes, there are two main aspects that we need to ponder on. Firstly is with regards to lack of safety features or the failure to fully understand the importance of safety features which in turn makes our home and/or its occupants an easy target to burglars/robbers The next is a likely scenario of accident/damage to the property or occupants due to some carelessness on our part to observe all necessary safety precautions.

Burglary Prevention Advice


REMOVE THE OPPORTUNITY, PREVENT THE BURGLAR


Burglary victims often wonder why the burglar picked on their house. To find out the answer you will first have to consider, "How does a burglar’s mind work?" If we can take measures that tell the burglars that this building is too difficult or too risky a target, he will hopefully move on. For a start never leave a spare keys concealed anywhere near the front door because burglars know all the hiding places. With regards to key storage indoors ensure that your keys are stored away from the front door. Also, never label your house keys; in case you lose them and they fall into the wrong hands.


Remove temptations. Ensure that your valuable property is kept out of sight from the windows. Valuables, such as gold rings, diamonds, silver, etc., should be kept in a safe-deposit box at your bank. If this is not possible, then all valuables should be kept locked up in a reasonable hiding place in your home.


Jewel cases that are kept in the open should not contain any of your valuable jewellery. A few inexpensive but rich-looking pieces can be kept in the jewel case as a decoy. This may satisfy the burglar and deter unnecessary ransacking of your home in search of valuables. Large amounts of money should not be kept in the home at any time.


Make it look as though your house is occupied. Install timers which switch lights/radio on and off automatically. Have a neighbour/friend come over to clear your letter box or doorstep. Encourage a neighbour to park in your drive. If going out after dark, draw the curtains, leave some lights and a radio playing.


If you are away for extended periods. Cancel the delivery of milk and newspapers. Disconnect the telephone answering machine or reword your greeting message to give the impression that you are only temporarily unable to answer. If you do not have an answering machine ensure that you completely plug off your phone or adjust the ringing tone to minimum so that when someone calls it doesn’t ring over and over without you there to pick it up. Enlist the help of a neighbour/friend/relative to keep a regular eye on your property and keep the front door clear of deliveries. If you are prepared to leave a key with a willing neighbour/relative ask for curtains to be drawn and lights to be put on at night. Set your burglar alarm. If you do not have one consider a ploy by installing a dummy alarm box in the hope that it will deter the opportunist thief. Notify your local police department that you are going to be absent, how long you will be away and where you can be contacted if necessary. Should a knowing neighbour or police patrol observe some person prowling around your home while your gone, they will not hesitate to take the appropriate action.


Many of us fail to take even fundamental precautions to secure our homes against robbery. Many have been lulled into thinking: "It cannot happen to me, not in my neighbourhood or in this well established city residential area." This approach makes the burglar's job much easier. If you still picture the burglar as a sinister thief operating at night, a handkerchief over his face, coat collar turned up and a peaked cap on his head, you are wrong!


Statistics indicate that in most cases the thief will most probably be one of the male youths in the neighbourhood, usually under 30 and most likely a teenager. He may be well dressed, wearing a recognizable uniform or suit jacket. It will more than likely be broad daylight.


The typical burglar does not want to harm you, just get into your home, steal what is available and valuable, and get out as quickly as possible, unobserved. Burglars like unlocked doors but if necessary, your door or window will be forced open to gain access. Of course, a burglar prefers that you not be in your home, so he/she may first knock at your door. If no one answers, the burglar enters. If you answer, the person will probably ask for directions to a particular street or block so you will not become suspicious. Some burglars will assume you are not home and enter without checking. Should this occur, do not attack the burglar who is as likely to be as frightened as you are. Try to memorize a description of the person, particularly facial characteristics. When the burglar leaves, call the police immediately.


Besides all that has been said above, another important factor in preventing this type of crime is making a security check of your residence to determine possible entry points and any weaknesses they may have. In doing your security check, ask yourself: "If I were a burglar, how would I break into my home?" Remember, the burglar likes to work unseen. Focus on entry areas protected by shrubs and side or rear entrances. Be well informed on how to secure windows, doors, etc., and what precautions you can take so that you may reduce your chances of becoming a victim. Home security is more than locks and lights. Your best protection is working together with neighbours to keep watch on each other's property.


HOW BURGLARS CHOOSE THEIR VICTIMS

What makes a particular house stand out as a tempting target for burglars? According to a previous research it has been noted that homeowners should ask themselves these following questions to determine if their house is inviting to an unwelcome visitor.


Is the house within three blocks of a major thoroughfare?


Is the house on a cul-de-sac?


Is the house adjacent to a wooded area, abandoned railroad tracks or park?


Is the house relatively more expensive than others in the neighborhood?


Are the occupants of the house newcomers to the neighborhood (within the past year)?


According to the research findings, if you answered "Yes" to three or more of these questions, your house may be a prime target for burglary.


On the question of "Do alarms deter burglaries?", the study also revealed that it appears they do. A home without an alarm is nearly three times as likely to be burgled.



INTRUDERS IN THE NIGHT

If you wake in the night and hear someone in you home, do not confront the intruder and try not to panic. Instead, switch on the lights and make a lot of noise. If you are on your own, pretend there is someone with you and call out to them. Ring the police as soon as you safely can.


14

CHILD SAFETY OUTDOORS

Posted by rayliew on 8:07 PM

Before sending your child to school or to a friend's home, go over this list to make sure you're doing everything to keep your child safe.


* Teach your child to recite his or her name, address and phone number, which could be used in case of an emergency.


* If you must send someone else to pick up your child, have a secret code word and teach your child to always ask for that code word (while standing a safe distance from the vehicle) before getting into anyone else's car.

* Make sure your child understands that he or she should never get in a car with anyone but Mom or Dad. Explain the concept of the "kind" stranger and the stranger who is not a child's friend.


* Make sure your child knows that he or she should not get into cars or go into the houses of neighbours he or she doesn't know very well. If possible go over a list of acceptable neighbours with your child.

* Explain to your child that, if lost or in danger, he or she can locate a pay phone and dial 999.


* Children should know that they do not need money to call 999. At the same time children should also be taught to never ever make prank calls using the 999 number and the consequences of doing so.Teach your child never to use a public restroom alone.

* Make your child understand that it is okay to say "no" to adults.

* Teach you child to be as loud as possible if he or she is in danger.

* Tell your child that it's okay to use physical violence, such as kicking, if he or she needs to protect him or herself from harm.

* Make sure your child knows that when he or she is out with you or any other family member, your child should never exit on his or her own without your prior knowledge.

* Teach your child how to identify a low risk adult from whom your child could seek help if he or she is separated from you in a public place.

* Teach your child to approach a police officer if he or she is in trouble while outdoors. Also ensure that your child is able to identify employee uniforms.

* Ensure that your child knows the body parts that are unacceptable for others to touch and also teach your child the boundaries for physical contact.

* Make sure your child knows to shout "no" or "stop" if someone touches him or her inappropriately.

* Make sure your child understands that even trusted people shouldn't ask your child to do something that makes him or her uncomfortable.

* Finally, assure your child that you trust his or her instincts, and that even if your child makes a bad choice with an innocent stranger, you will support your child.

0

KEEPING YOUR CAR SAFE

Posted by rayliew on 9:15 PM

Your car may be the most expensive thing you own. It is also the most likely target for thieves. Of late we in Sarawak have been faced with an increase in vehicle theft. So we believe this next part would be of special interest to some of you out there. A lot of crime can be stopped. With regards to vehicle theft, among the steps that has to be taken to counter this includes the following:

#Always lock the doors and windows of your car when leaving it and take your valuables with you or lock them in the boot.



#If you have a garage, park your car there. If not, park in a well-lit place.

#Think about fitting a car alarm and a gear lock and having the windows etched with an identification number.

#If you are buying a new radio/cassette player, think about choosing one that is security -coded or removable by the driver.

#In case of motorcycle have a double lock.

#Don't leave valuables, briefcases or even coats on show inside your vehicle. If you cannot take them with you, lock them in the boot. Don’t tuck them behind a seat. (Doesn’t this sound familiar. Well I believe most of us do that don’t we?). Not any more ya!.

#Etch all windows, wing mirrors, light and any radio or hi-fi with the car registration or some

special number. Similarly, security mark other expensive parts with an ultra violet pen. It makes your car a lot harder for thieves to sell.

0

HOME SAFETY DURING FESTIVE SEASONS

Posted by rayliew on 5:14 AM
HOME SAFETY

We all know that with regards to safety of our homes, there are two main aspects that we need to ponder on. Firstly is with regards to lack of safety features or the failure to fully understand the importance of safety features which in turn makes our home and/or its occupants an easy target to burglars/robbers The next is a likely scenario of accident/damage to the property or occupants due to some carelessness on our part to observe all necessary safety precautions.
Burglary Prevention Advice

REMOVE THE OPPORTUNITY, PREVENT THE BURGLAR

Burglary victims often wonder why the burglar picked on their house. To find out the answer you will first have to consider, "How does a burglar’s mind work?" If we can take measures that tell the burglars that this building is too difficult or too risky a target, he will hopefully move on. For a start never leave a spare keys concealed anywhere near the front door because burglars know all the hiding places. With regards to key storage indoors ensure that your keys are stored away from the front door. Also, never label your house keys; in case you lose them and they fall into the wrong hands.

Remove temptations. Ensure that your valuable property is kept out of sight from the windows.

Valuables, such as gold rings, diamonds, silver, etc., should be kept in a safe-deposit box at your bank. If this is not possible, then all valuables should be kept locked up in a reasonable hiding place in your home.

Jewel cases that are kept in the open should not contain any of your valuable jewellery. A few inexpensive but rich-looking pieces can be kept in the jewel case as a decoy. This may satisfy the burglar and deter unnecessary ransacking of your home in search of valuables.

Large amounts of money should not be kept in the home at any time.

Make it look as though your house is occupied. Install timers which switch lights/radio on and off automatically. Have a neighbour/friend come over to clear your letter box or doorstep.


Encourage a neighbour to park in your drive. If going out after dark, draw the curtains, leave some lights and a radio playing.

If you are away for extended periods. Cancel the delivery of milk and newspapers. Disconnect the telephone answering machine or reword your greeting message to give the impression that you are only temporarily unable to answer. If you do not have an answering machine ensure that you completely plug off your phone or adjust the ringing tone to minimum so that when someone calls it doesn’t ring over and over without you there to pick it up.
Enlist the help of a neighbour/friend/relative to keep a regular eye on your property and keep the front door clear of deliveries. If you are prepared to leave a key with a willing neighbour/relative ask for curtains to be drawn and lights to be put on at night.

Set your burglar alarm. If you do not have one consider a ploy by installing a dummy alarm box in the hope that it will deter the opportunist thief.

Notify your local police department that you are going to be absent, how long you will be away and where you can be contacted if necessary. Should a knowing neighbour or police patrol observe some person prowling around your home while your gone, they will not hesitate to take the appropriate action.

Many of us fail to take even fundamental precautions to secure our homes against robbery. Many have been lulled into thinking: "It cannot happen to me, not in my neighbourhood or in this well established city residential area." This approach makes the burglar's job much easier. If you still picture the burglar as a sinister thief operating at night, a handkerchief over his face, coat collar turned up and a peaked cap on his head, you are wrong!

Statistics indicate that in most cases the thief will most probably be one of the male youths in the neighbourhood, usually under 30 and most likely a teenager. He may be well dressed, wearing a recognizable uniform or suit jacket. It will more than likely be broad daylight.

The typical burglar does not want to harm you, just get into your home, steal what is available and valuable, and get out as quickly as possible, unobserved. Burglars like unlocked doors but if necessary, your door or window will be forced open to gain access. Of course, a burglar prefers that you not be in your home, so he/she may first knock at your door. If no one answers, the burglar enters. If you answer, the person will probably ask for directions to a particular street or block so you will not become suspicious. Some burglars will assume you are not home and enter without checking. Should this occur, do not attack the burglar who is as likely to be as frightened as you are. Try to memorize a description of the person, particularly facial characteristics. When the burglar leaves, call the police immediately.

Besides all that has been said above, another important factor in preventing this type of crime is making a security check of your residence to determine possible entry points and any weaknesses they may have. In doing your security check, ask yourself: "If I were a burglar, how would I break into my home?" Remember, the burglar likes to work unseen. Focus on entry areas protected by shrubs and side or rear entrances. Be well informed on how to secure windows, doors, etc., and what precautions you can take so that you may reduce your chances of becoming a victim. Home security is more than locks and lights. Your best protection is working together with neighbours to keep watch on each other's property.
HOW BURGLARS CHOOSE THEIR VICTIMS
What makes a particular house stand out as a tempting target for burglars? According to a previous research it has been noted that homeowners should ask themselves these following questions to determine if their house is inviting to an unwelcome visitor.

Is the house within three blocks of a major thoroughfare?
Is the house on a cul-de-sac?
Is the house adjacent to a wooded area, abandoned railroad tracks or park?
Is the house relatively more expensive than others in the neighborhood?
Are the occupants of the house newcomers to the neighborhood (within the past year)?

According to the research findings, if you answered "Yes" to three or more of these questions, your house may be a prime target for burglary.

On the question of "Do alarms deter burglaries?", the study also revealed that it appears they do. A home without an alarm is nearly three times as likely to be burgled.

INTRUDERS IN THE NIGHT

If you wake in the night and hear someone in you home, do not confront the intruder and try not to panic. Instead, switch on the lights and make a lot of noise. If you are on your own, pretend there is someone with you and call out to them. Ring the police as soon as you safely can.

0

SAFETY TIPS FOR THE ELDERLY

Posted by rayliew on 6:49 AM
Senior citizens can learn how to protect themselves from crime by following these simple suggestions. If you know of an elderly person, please share these tips with them and do your bit in making it tough for criminals to work in your neighbuorhood. The following tips can encompass 5 main areas, namely

AT HOME
*Never open your door automatically. Install and use a peephole.
*Lock your doors and windows.
*Vary your daily routine.
*Use "Neighbourhood Watch" to keep an eye on your neighbourhood.
*Don't leave notes on the door when going out.
*Leave lights on when going out at night; use a timer to turn lights on and off when you are away for an extended period.
*Notify neighbours and the police when going away on a trip.
*When you are away remember to cancel deliveries such as newspapers and arrange for someone probably a neighbour's child, to perhaps mow the lawn if need be. Arrange for your mail to be held by the Post Office, or ask a neighbour to collect it for you.
*Be wary of unsolicited offers to make repairs to your home. Deal only with reputable businesses.
*Keep an inventory with serial numbers and photographs of re-saleable appliances, antiques and furniture. Leave copies in a safe place.
*Don't hesitate to report crime or suspicious activities.
*Install deadbolt locks on all your doors.
*Keep your home well lit at night, inside and out. Keep curtains closed.
*Ask for proper identification from delivery persons or strangers.
*If a stranger asks to use your telephone, offer to place the call for him or her by yourself instead of letting a stranger into your home.
*Never ever let a stranger into your home.
*Do not hide your keys under the mat or in other conspicuous places.
*Never give out information over the phone indicating you are alone or that you won't be home at a certain time.
*If you arrive at home and suspect a stranger may be inside, DON'T GO IN. Leave quietly and call 999 to report the crime.


DURING BANKING
*Many criminals know exactly when government checks arrive each month, and may pick that day to attack. Avoid this by using Direct Deposit, which sends your money directly from the government to the bank of your choice.
*Never withdraw money from your bank accounts for anyone except YOURSELF. Be wary of con artists and get-rich schemes that probably are too-good-to-be- true.
*You should store valuables in a Safe Deposit Box.Never give your money to someone who calls on you, identifying himself as a bank official. A bank will never ask you to remove your money.
*If you have been swindled or conned, report the crime to your local police immediately.


WHILE IN YOUR CAR
*Always keep your car doors locked, whether you are in or out of your car. Keep your gas tank full and your engine properly maintained to avoid breakdowns.
*If your car breaks down, pull over to the side, raise the hood, and wait INSIDE the car for help. *Avoid getting out of the car and making yourself a target before police arrive.
*At stop signs and traffic lights, keep the car in gear.
*Travel well-lit and busy streets. Plan your route.
*Don't leave your purse on the seat beside you; put it on the floor, where it is more difficult for someone to grab it.
*Lock bundles or bags in the trunk. If interesting packages are out of sight, a thief will be less tempted to break in to steal them.
*When returning to your car, check the front and back seat before entering.
*Never pick up hitchhikers.


WHILE OUT SHOPPING
*Carry your purse very close to you. Don't dangle it from your arm. Never leave your purse in a shopping cart. Never leave your purse unattended.
*Don't carry any more cash than is necessary.
*Don't display large sums of cash.


WHILE OUT WALKING
*If you are attacked on the street, make as much noise as possible by calling for help or blowing a whistle. Do not pursue your attacker. Call 999 and report the crime as soon as possible.
*Avoid walking alone at night. Try to have a friend accompany you in high risk areas, even during the daytime.
*Avoid carrying weapons as they may be used against you.
*Always plan your route and stay alert to your surroundings.
*Walk confidently.
*Stay away from dark/dimly lit buildings and doorways. Walk in well-lighted areas.
*Have your key ready when approaching your front door.
*Don't dangle your purse away from your body.
*Don't carry large, bulky shoulder bags. Carry only what you need. Better yet, sew a small *pocket inside your jacket or coat. If you don't have a purse, no one will try to snatch it.

0

Crimes Involving Students On The Rise

Posted by rayliew on 7:01 PM
Criminal cases involving school students in the country is on the rise according to the number of reported cases over the last two years. Inspector-General of Police Tan Sri Musa Hassan said in 2007, a total of 1,838 criminal cases were reported where 3,383 students were arrested.
In a text of speech read by Kota Samarahan district police head of management ASP Mohd Fahdil Antum, who represented the district police chief, DSP Abang Abdillah Abang Majid yesterday, the IGP said of that figure, 3,241 students arrested were between 13 and 18 years old.

Based on the total number of cases, crimes involving school students are always on the rise and it has raised concerns among schools, parents and also the public. A total of 202 members and six Police Cadet Corps officers from six secondary schools from Samarahan District participated in the march to celebrate the national-level anniversary. The schools were Sekolah Menengah Kebangsaan (SMK) Wira Penrissen, SMK Muara Tuang, SMK Kota Samarahan, SMK Asajaya, SMK Semera and SMK Pasentren Abdul Taib Mahmud, Sadong Jaya.


According to Musa, a total of 2,218 criminal cases involved students last year where 3,725 were arrested for various criminal offences. From the 3,725 arrested, 3,629 were between 13 and 18 years old and were involved in crimes like murder, rape, robbery, rioting and break-ins. A survey by the Malaysian Youth Development Research Institution (MYDRI) in collaboration with the Society Psychology and Development Study Centre (SPDSC) revealed that about 87 per cent of ‘mat rempit’ were between 14 and 25 years old.


About 48.1 per cent of ‘mat rempit’ do it (illegal motorbike racing) because of boredom, 38 per cent to spend their free time and 27.8 per cent because they were influenced by friends. “I believe that these social ills could be controlled if the students were given right exposure, clear explanation on ill effects and the consequences of being involved in criminal activities. Musa pointed out that the students’ involvement with the Police Cadet Corps would be able to instil discipline in them apart from preventing them from being involved in crimes.

1

Law prohibiting glue sniffing to be tabled soon

Posted by rayliew on 4:19 AM
Traders who sell inhalants to young children will be in trouble once a law to prohibit glue sniffing and abuse of inhalants in general is passed. National Association for Drug Prevention Malaysia (Pemadam) Secretary General Dato Kamilia Ibrahim said that there was a suggestion to make an anti-glue sniffing law as the problem is getting rampant in the country. In pointing out that the draft of the act is with the Attorney General and would be tabled in the next parliamentary sitting, she said the act would ban the misuse of inhalants.

This means that inhalant sellers can be convicted so that the items cannot be easily obtained by children. Those involved in glue sniffing are children aged 13 and below. If possible, we will prohibit sales to 13-year-olds and below. We don’t want glue normally used to repair shoes to be easily obtained. The glue is sold very cheaply and a group of 10 children may only have to fork out around 20 sen each. Pemadam will put extra effort to push the government to enforce the act after it is passed by parliament.



Current students’ involvement in drugs, she said that the group only represented 2.11 per cent or 261 people whom the National Anti-Dadah Agency (AADK) registered as drug addicts as of 2008. The total number of registered drug addicts in the whole country is 12,352, of whom 12,076 are males. The highest rate at 69.67 per cent are youths aged 19 to 29 while 28.22 per cent are adults. On Pemadam’s Drug Free Community by 2015, there were five target groups under the goal - family, community, schools, higher institutions of learning and the workforce.
The target for this year is the workforce and Pemadam will try its best to reach the target.

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